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"Supreme Court Building (12/03/1939)"
Washington, D.C.
"Very Hazy Sun"

 

 

History

Prior to the establishment of the Federal City, the United States government resided briefly in New York City, New York. As such, the Supreme Court met there during this time in the Merchants Exchange Building. When the capital moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Court moved with it and began meeting in Independence Hall, before settling in Old City Hall at 5th and Chestnut Streets from 1791 until 1800.

After the federal government moved to Washington, D.C., the court had no permanent meeting location until 1810. When the architect Benjamin Latrobe built the second U.S. Senate chamber directly on top of first US Senate chamber, the Supreme Court took up residence in what is now referred to as the Old Supreme Court Chamber from 1810 through 1860. It remained in the Capitol until 1935, with the exception of a period from 1812 to 1819, during which the Court was absent from Washington because of the British invasion and destruction of the Capitol in the War of 1812.

In 1810, the Supreme Court first occupied the Old Supreme Court Chamber in the Capitol. As the Senate expanded, it progressively outgrew its quarters. In 1860, the Supreme Court moved to the Old Senate Chamber (as it is now known) where it remained until its move to the current Supreme Court building. In 1929, Chief Justice William Howard Taft argued successfully for the Court to have its own headquarters to distance itself from Congress as an independent branch of government, but did not live to see it built. The court was finally designed by Cass Gilbert, who created many other structures in the United States.




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The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of Jeffery T. Lowe.

Use of any image as the basis for another photographic concept or illustration (digital, artist rendering or alike) is a violation of the United States and International Copyright laws. All images are copyrighted © 2004 - 2014 Jeffery T. Lowe.

 
 
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